theme by pouretrebelle
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It’s so easy to suffer from depression and imagine suicide (especially with such dramatic style as jumping off of the skyway) will leave you looking like a victim of this horrible world and beloved in everyone’s mind. I’m glad that you’re showing it in a different light, because suicide is neither beautiful nor romantic.

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-   Jennifer, St. Pete Beach  - the Sunshine Skyway (#4 suicide bridge in the US) is the attraction of choice for many contemplating life’s self end

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Our culture has squeezed all the juice out of the words “I love you.” So as a neo-neo-neo-romantic I’m looking for ways to depict romance and love that make those concepts fresh. I want to depict love as an act of dedication and will. That was the core of the story “Romance,” having the ability to love someone for their true self instead of your own fantasy about them. My quest to show this goes all the way back to ‘Fight Club’ where two people gradually reveal themselves to one another, warts and all.

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-  Chuck Palahniuk

eternal-sighs asked:
....I am just so petrified of the future, the unknown, death, the afterlife, the big picture. I'm scared of being a failure and I'm scared of making it big. I don't know why I feel this way and when I ask for advice people give me generic answers like, "You just need to exercise more." I lay awake at night for hours on end, my mind racing, my chest feeling like a black hole. This keeps me from achieving so much. Have you ever felt this way? How do I stop myself from being fearful of life itself?

chuckpalahniuk:

Write a story wherein everything you fear comes to pass.  Then make it worse.  Then, keep making it worse.  Exhaust all your worst fears on the page.  That works for me.  Then… if you can actually sell it you’ll really conquer your demons.   Eventually, as you write, you’ll even begin to laugh at those terrors.  Trust me.  It works.

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Do you still perform autopsies on conversations you had lives ago?

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-  Donte Collins (via splitterherzen)

(Source: bleedwell)

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You cut up a thing that’s alive and beautiful to find out how it’s alive and why it’s beautiful, and before you know it, it’s neither of those things, and you’re standing there with blood on your face and tears in your sight and only the terrible ache of guilt to show for it.

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-  Clive Barker, The Damnation Game (via splitterherzen)

(Source: rabbitinthemoon)

louijover:

the swells of passion

louijover:

the swells of passion

“Almost nobody dances sober, unless they happen to be insane.” ―H. P. Lovecraft 

“Almost nobody dances sober, unless they happen to be insane.” 
H. P. Lovecraft 

"

I’ve been thinking about something lately.

Imagine this:

You’re on an airplane, sleeping with your head against the window, your heart set on being home this time three hours from now. All of a sudden, something goes very wrong. The plane stops moving across the air and instead starts falling through it. The lights are flickering and the movie is skipping. The plane dips hundreds of feet in seconds, and the yellow cups fall from the ceiling. They’re a brighter shade of yellow than you remember, because unlike the demonstration, these cups have never been handled before. “Flight attendants take your seats now”, you hear, the pilot’s voice trembling over a cacophony of alert tones. You get that smell in the bridge of your nose like you’ve just been hit with a football. That’s what the fear smells like. The plane is going down.

Four more drastic drops in under a minute. People are crying. For all the folklore about how your life flashes before your eyes, you’re remarkably fixed on one vision – your parents. They’re sleeping at this very moment, in a bedroom so quiet they can hear the clock in the kitchen. And you can see them, clear as can be. You wish you could see a playground or a first kiss, but all you can see is your parents sleeping. Huh. Well, that’s that.

Several long minutes go by. Then, all at once, the lights come back on and the plane somehow rights itself. Some people cheer, but most people cry harder. The plane lands about an hour later, and as soon as you feel that touch down – hell, even when you were within 50 feet of the ground and could still technically survive a fall – you realize that however you brokered the deal between you and God worked; you’ve just been granted life in overtime.

Here’s the question: what do you change? Whom do you call that you haven’t spoken to in years? Whom do you realize has been toxic to your heart and drop with surprising ease? What trips do you cancel, and what trips do you book? What can’t you be bothered with anymore? What’s the new you like?

Think about that, and then ask one more question. Why not just change it all right now?

"

-  John Mayer  (via the-other-side-of-alice)

(Source: contrafuckingband)

(Source: deprsv)

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It’s okay to be scared. I was terrified of everything — still am. But tune out media for a while. It wasn’t until I shed television for ten years that I seemed to calm down and fuse my education with my experience and learn the skill of writing. Everything I thought would destroy me ( huge terminal mistakes ) forced me to write and gave me a new life.

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-  Chuck Palahniuk (on what he would say to this teenage generation)

bl-ossomed:

Here’s What Gaza Explosions Look Like From Space.

bl-ossomed:

Here’s What Gaza Explosions Look Like From Space.

(Source: cherry-ko-ko)

brightwalldarkroom:

Excerpt from the new issue: Karina Wolf on Lost in America (1985):

"Only people who haven’t experienced crippling need could throw away advantages so blithely. Dropping out suggests assurance in your own resources. It connotes not just sufficiency, but overabundance. Other generations had no choice about their compromises. 
Anxiety, David’s hallmark, is the product of uncertainty but also of hope. His is a conflict of the 1980s, when after a long recession, there was an itch to think about ‘happiness’ and ‘fulfillment’ along with an urge for middle-class stability. The Americans that David and Linda meet on the road don’t suffer the same doubts, because they aren’t gifted with the same opportunities. Does being poor make you honest? No, it just means you have fewer comforts and fewer options. 
And maybe this is all to say that Lost In America, with its very different and tempered resolution (in which David and Linda long to reclaim their much-interrogated status quo), teaches the same lessons that Easy Rider does more darkly: freedom and itinerancy demand a heavy price, and maybe that’s too terrible to bear.”

To read the rest of this essay, download the Bright Wall/Dark Room app to your iPhone or iPad for free, or subscribe online for $2 to receive immediate access to the entire issue on your computer.

brightwalldarkroom:

Excerpt from the new issue: Karina Wolf on Lost in America (1985):

"Only people who haven’t experienced crippling need could throw away advantages so blithely. Dropping out suggests assurance in your own resources. It connotes not just sufficiency, but overabundance. Other generations had no choice about their compromises. 

Anxiety, David’s hallmark, is the product of uncertainty but also of hope. His is a conflict of the 1980s, when after a long recession, there was an itch to think about ‘happiness’ and ‘fulfillment’ along with an urge for middle-class stability. The Americans that David and Linda meet on the road don’t suffer the same doubts, because they aren’t gifted with the same opportunities. Does being poor make you honest? No, it just means you have fewer comforts and fewer options. 

And maybe this is all to say that Lost In America, with its very different and tempered resolution (in which David and Linda long to reclaim their much-interrogated status quo), teaches the same lessons that Easy Rider does more darkly: freedom and itinerancy demand a heavy price, and maybe that’s too terrible to bear.”

To read the rest of this essay, download the Bright Wall/Dark Room app to your iPhone or iPad for free, or subscribe online for $2 to receive immediate access to the entire issue on your computer.

vacilandoelmundo:

Colors are the New Black by Mademoiselle Maurice

mymodernmet:

French artist Mademoiselle Maurice created this gorgeous map of the world with rainbow-colored drips of water. This piece, along with other artworks, will be on display at the artist’s solo exhibition Colors are the New Black until mid-July at the Backside Gallery in Marseille, France.